THE CURRENT INDUSTRY LANDSCAPE IS NOT SUSTAINABLE 

The term medical devices covers a wide variety of items, from a simple pair of sutures or a wheelchair to pacemakers and vascular grafts. All of which are essential to providing uncompromised patient care for healthcare organizations across the U.S. Be it a small rural clinic or a nine-hundred-bed hospital, medical devices are a major part of the healthcare industry. The U.S. Department of Commerce estimates that the US medical device market has grown to $150 billion in 2016. Currently, there are over 6,500 medical device companies that supply innovative products and services to over 5,600 healthcare provider locations in the U.S.  Through the growth and evolution of this significant market over the past 50 years, the importance of having the right instrument or implant at the right place at the right time is increasingly critical.  Unlike the retail sector where a stock-out usually means a lost or delayed sale, a stock-out within the health industry results in a much worse outcome, and must be avoided at all costs, as this puts patient safety at risk and seriously jeopardizes the relationship between the healthcare provider and supplier.

To prevent this, medical device manufacturers have developed numerous, often complex, supply chain and distribution models. These traditional models often rely on the sales representative or inventory specialist delivering the product to the hospital on the final mile of its journey...